TRD Intake

TRD Intake Installed

It all started out with me wanting to replace my AFE Dryflow drop-in filter to do some general maintenance on the FR-S since I’ve had it a year now. Well, after reading through lots and lots of posts and articles, I decided on the TRD Intake.

It has a straight back intake tube design with a HUGE filter area and completely eliminates the sound generator nonsense that’s in the car. The stock snorkel for cold air is used to maintain consistent air pressure while the large box really lets it flow into the tube. I like how it looks and you can feel a bit of performance gain on the butt-dyno. I would suspect the largest gains are lower in the RPM band (which is where this car is seriously lacking power).

 

TRD Intake Installed

TRD Intake Installed

 

Installation was very easy with the supplied instructions. Rather than give a step-by-step of the procedure, here’s a link to the instructions in .pdf form:

FRS-PTR03-18130.pdf

That document contains all of the part numbers for replacement components, including the air filter (which looks to be a re-branded K&N filter). Speaking of part numbers, the part number for this intake is: PTR03-18130

Now for some pictures…

Here’s the box it all came in:

TRD Intake system Box

TRD Intake system Box

 

And here are all of the goodies that were inside.

TRD Intake system components

TRD Intake system components

As you can see from the above pics, this is a real quality intake system. It’s practically an OEM part.

 

Here are the tools that I used to do the install:

Tools Used during Install

Tools Used during Install

A torque wrench is likely not that necessary, but since they provided the specs, I figured I’d follow them since I can be somewhat anal about these things. The torque wrench is for lower torque and all measurements are given in in-lbf instead of ft-lbf. So, if you’re going to use one, be sure you don’t mess that up.

Also, you need to transfer 2 of your metal and rubber grommets from the stock intake to the new one.  They go in and out easier if you pop the metal sleeve out and then remove the rubber piece.

 

Once it’s installed, you’re left with these pieces:

Leftover stock parts after Install

Leftover stock parts after Install

  • 3x M6 bolts
  • 1x small worm clamp
  • Sound Generator tubes and some center piece
  • Stock Airbox components with your filter
  • Stock Resonator
  • Stock Intake tube

 

And here’s the Before and After pics of the engine bay so you can get a feel for how it looks in comparison to stock…

Engine Bay Before Install

Engine Bay Before Install

Engine Bay After Install

Engine Bay After Install

 

The installation took me 45 minutes since I was taking my time with things and making sure not to scratch anything.  I also had my tripod in place the whole time so I could get some before/during/after shots and I had to work around that.  The fastest install for this could maybe be 30 minutes.  But I would recommend taking your time and not messing anything up.

Removing the sound generator tube from the frame rail location was a little stubborn, but it came off eventually.  I would say that just about anyone could do this install in an hour or less with the supplied instructions and the proper tools (10mm, 8mm, pliers, philips screwdriver).  I used a speed ratchet because I have one and they make it much quicker than a regular one.  I have air tools as well, but that would have been extreme overkill.

 

Impressions

The main thing I noticed was how quiet it is inside the car now with the windows up.  That sound generator tube really added a bunch of noise to fool you into thinking you had a much bigger engine in the car or something.  I don’t really care about the sound too much.  A nice exhaust will help that out.  😉

Driving around, I noticed it pulled a little stronger right away.  It wasn’t much, but it was definitely noticeable in some cases.  There were no CELs or anything like that.  Since the battery was disconnected during installation, I’ll wait a while and see if the ECU adjusts anything based on the air volume/flow changes that may exist.

Another thing that I noticed is that the bluetooth calling works better.  What I mean by this is that the person that I’m talking to can now hear me instead of just a bunch of noise and vibration.  I believe that was caused by the sound generator tube.  So, since it’s removed, I have a better user experience with my Pioneer Head Unit as well.

Overall, I’m happy with the intake.  I wasn’t expecting a huge jump in performance as that’s not really possible with just an intake.  I might update this post after I’ve driven with it for a while to see if I notice any other little differences (gas mileage or other things).

I might have to buy the TRD oil cap now to match the intake.  haha.

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